Is he up to it meaning?

"He is not up to it". Does it mean "he is not that apt to do something"? OR it means "he doesn't plan to do anything right now"? In the expression "What are you up to?" it mean

Is he up to it meaning?

"He is not up to it".

Does it mean "he is not that apt to do something"?

OR  it means "he doesn't plan to do anything right now"?

In the expression "What are you up to?" it means that what have you planned to do today. Right?  It's one question per thread, do I'll answer your first.

"He's not up to it" means "he's not fit for the task (in question)", the 'it' refers to whatever task that was previously being spoken of.

Of the two options you offered therefore, it means the first: "he is not that apt to do something" (provided that by 'apt', you mean fit or suited).

Beryl from Northallerton said:   It's one question per thread, do I'll answer your first.

"He's not up to it" means "he's not fit for the task (in question)", the 'it' refers to whatever task that was previously being spoken of.

Of the two options you offered therefore, it means the first: "he is not that apt to do something" (provided that by 'apt', you mean fit or suited). Click to expand... So, if we want to change the statement "he is not up to it" to a question, it would be " Is he up to it?" and the with the added W-H question, it would be "What is he up to"? which is extremely similar to the question " What are you up to" which means that "what have you planned to do today and what is your programe". So, why is that? Why should be a big difference in the meaning of two sentences which are 99% alike?

One interrogative form of "he is not up to it" could be "is he up to it?", which would mean "is he capable (of X)?"

In English, small differences in the wording of a sentence can give rise to great changes in the overall meaning of the sentence. The inclusion or omission of the word 'it', is an example of this phenomenon.

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