Can you become fluent in 6 months?

genix79 CanadaJune 2017I have been studying Korean. It is grouped with Chinese and Arabic in being one of the languages which take perhaps the longest for an English speaker to be

Can you become fluent in 6 months?

genix79

ca

CanadaJune 2017

I have been studying Korean. It is grouped with Chinese and Arabic in being one of the languages which take perhaps the longest for an English speaker to become proficient in. So I'll tell you where I am at and you could possibly use it as a data point for the other languages similarly grouped in terms of 'difficulty'.

I have about 500 hours worth of total 'study' in the language. I spent the first 300+ hours almost exclusively doing reading and listening before reviewing my progress and realizing my deficiencies. (And then doing some changes to my approach to language learning).

So without going into detail about what I changed and why, heres where I find myself at after about 500 hours of Korean (250-ish of this is listening practice):

I am generally unable to understand native speakers - aside from catching individual words or odd phrases here and there. For me to engage a native speaker and understand what is being said _to_ me, they need to either use simple sentences or speak slower than their native speaking speed. Lack of vocabulary is a big hindrance, and it means native speakers may have to restate things using different word choices for me to understand.

For my reproduction of the language - both spoken (of which Ive admittedly had little practice) and written (which I have much more practice) I am confounded both by lack of grammar and vocabulary. Were I to think about all the everyday situations and conversation topics I engage in, I could say a bit about many of them in Korean... however I could not say the kinds of things I would say in English on those topics.

So I can speak or write simply on a variety of topics while making some grammatical errors, but lack of vocab and grammar prevent me from having a normal adult conversation on everyday topics.

Currently I am doing a review of my progress thus far, but tentatively I will give myself a solid A2 on the CEFR scale. I'm no expert, but just going by the descriptions of what A2 entails.

usablefiber

us

United StatesJune 2017

I have heard stories of english speakers learning Spanish or Portuguese to a high level in 6 months with an obsessive level of study..... but after studying Korean like gangbusters for the past 3-6 months... I can say that 6 months of chinese or arabic will probably not get you to fluency.

georgiaichigo

br

BrazilJune 2017

@usablefiber I became fluent in english within 8 months studying one hour a day, but I had some help on grammar because I studied in school. So, if a person is putting a lot of time in order to learn a latin language - knowing english - this would be achievable.

I'm curious to know why are you learning portuguese over spanish? I know in USA there's more spanish speaking people than portuguese and it's quite common see someone that learn spanish first and then learn portuguese.

usablefiber

us

United StatesJune 2017

Yea, My point was that a romance or related European language can be learned well in 6-8 months, but Chinese, Korean, or Arabic, which the OP asked about, you just can't reach native fluency in 6 months which I can say from experience. There is just too much to get used to: grammar, writing, pronunciation, the vocabulary... is all wildly different. It takes time. It's fun, but it takes time.

As for Portuguese? I just thought Brazilian Portuguese sounded really cool and it would be fun and exotic to learn.

Unfortunately, this decision has backfired on me. I moved into a apartment this week in a completely Spanish speaking neighborhood as In the past year and a half I basically studied every language BUT Spanish.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

@usablefiber: "Unfortunately, this decision has backfired on me. I moved into a apartment this week in a completely Spanish speaking neighborhood as In the past year and a half I basically studied every language BUT Spanish."

Similar backfire: I've been teaching ESL to adult professionals for 10 years. 90% of my clients speak Spanish. I studied Latin, German, and Japanese in school. I've thought since I was a kid that Spanish is a beautiful sounding language. In addition, I find Latin American culture absolutely fascinating.

YET: Despite the professional advantage for me, I put off learning Spanish for 8.5 years! Why did I procrastinate for so long ?!? I could have been totally fluent by now!!

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

<<I've been teaching ESL to adult professionals for 10 years. 90% of my clients speak Spanish.>>

I'm curious as to under what conditions this is happening. Are you in a Spanish-speaking country training businessmen to come to the US? Because I would think that Spanish/Mexican companies doing business in the US would already have English speakers at their disposal.

Here in the US, foreign-born professionals with limited English capabilities tend to be Indian, Pakistani, or from other Asian countries.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

I'm in the USA, teaching executives, politicians, business owners, doctors etc. Many clients work for multinationals like GE, P&G, Johnson & Johnson, etc. The personal goals of my clients vary a lot. For the multinationals, English is used at the global level. So when the client is promoted from a local level position (say Sales Manager) to a position with more responsibility, increasing proficiency in English goes with it. The small business owners are often interested in trading outside of LATAM and have suppliers in China and want customers in North America. So they want to be able to negotiate in English.

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

毫无疑问你是对的:) An obsessive 4-6 month Mandarin study (10-12 hours every day) could lead to recognizing a meaning or two and being able to pronounce around 3000 individual characters (4000-4500 is enough for complete fluency outside literature or very specific fields). But to be able to read even a simple new text relatively comfortably at acceptable speed, add another 6 months. That's just the writing. And there's no way to get fluent (at least efficiently) without the ability to read. Listening, another obsessive period of 1 year (could partly overlap with learning to read), slowly getting used to Chinese people's weird ways of trying to speak standard mandarin (depends on which part of China you want to interact with). A substantial amount of 成语 (usually 4 character phrases) that they love to use, add another period of 1 year exposure to massive amounts of texts. It's actually very rewarding to get more and more advanced in Chinese, as learning new vocabulary gets easier and easier (combinations of already known characters' meanings). It just takes enormous amount of time to get up to speed. I would say I already devoted well over 2000 hours to the language in my 26 months of studying it, yet I cannot listen to news or watch tv series freely, and having longer conversations is still difficult. The pronunciation varies too much in real life and it takes big effort to get enough exposure in this regard.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

"slowly getting used to Chinese people's weird ways of trying to speak standard mandarin"

Glad someone said it!

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

It's quite frustrating really

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Where are you learning it?

Mariotkd

pl

PolandJune 2017

2000 hours? That is really a lot! Chinese is like a black hole, it literally takes all of your time and energy. In order to truly master Chinese one needs to move to China and stay there forever, because moving back to our native country will again worsen your skills. Of course this is not about you, but my general observation of people studying Chinese. I'm yet to see anybody with C2 level in Chinese who lives outside of China.

usablefiber

us

United StatesJune 2017

This guy said it took him 1 year of hard study followed by 1 year of living in Taiwan....

You can be the judge of his fluency. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3HOuq4DRJ0

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

Is that 2 years after he started studying? Or is it longer and he just claims to already have been fluent after 2 years? His pronunciation is good, and he is very likely fluent now in other aspects of language than just reading news, but I have a strong feeling that video is not after 2 years of him doing Chinese.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Sounds about right. Steve studied full time (40 hours a week+) as his job. After 10 months he passed the diplomatic exam and visited the canton trade fairs in the following years and was fluent.

Cosmo678

de

GermanyJuly 2017

"Chinese is like a black hole" I completely agree!!

Cosmo678

de

GermanyJuly 2017

I completely agree with your post. I am studying Chinese for about two years (one or sometimes two hours a day, I think about 1000 hours in total). There is no way I can have long discussions. Problem for me are the tones and pronunciation. Sometimes my tutor doesnt understand my words and I have problems understanding what he is saying although I know all the words. In my opinion, it is not possible to achieve real fluency after 6 months. You can say some phrases such as What time is it or where is the train station? but no way you are going to have a conversation with a Chinese about a political topic.

georgiaichigo

br

BrazilJuly 2017

Unfortunely usablefiber. But I can guarantee you'll have a great time when visit Brazil. Besides of that, I can give you some tips of wonderful places to visit, for example: Porto das Galinhas, Fernando de Noronha, Gramado (which is, by the way, my hometow), among others.

Just contact me and I will help you as much as I can.

georgiaichigo

br

BrazilJune 2017

@usablefiber I became fluent in english within 8 months studying one hour a day, but I had some help on grammar because I studied in school. So, if a person is putting a lot of time in order to learn a latin language - knowing english - this would be achievable.

I'm curious to know why are you learning portuguese over spanish? I know in USA there's more spanish speaking people than portuguese and it's quite common see someone that learn spanish first and then learn portuguese.

usablefiber

us

United StatesJune 2017

Yea, My point was that a romance or related European language can be learned well in 6-8 months, but Chinese, Korean, or Arabic, which the OP asked about, you just can't reach native fluency in 6 months which I can say from experience. There is just too much to get used to: grammar, writing, pronunciation, the vocabulary... is all wildly different. It takes time. It's fun, but it takes time.

As for Portuguese? I just thought Brazilian Portuguese sounded really cool and it would be fun and exotic to learn.

Unfortunately, this decision has backfired on me. I moved into a apartment this week in a completely Spanish speaking neighborhood as In the past year and a half I basically studied every language BUT Spanish.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

@usablefiber: "Unfortunately, this decision has backfired on me. I moved into a apartment this week in a completely Spanish speaking neighborhood as In the past year and a half I basically studied every language BUT Spanish."

Similar backfire: I've been teaching ESL to adult professionals for 10 years. 90% of my clients speak Spanish. I studied Latin, German, and Japanese in school. I've thought since I was a kid that Spanish is a beautiful sounding language. In addition, I find Latin American culture absolutely fascinating.

YET: Despite the professional advantage for me, I put off learning Spanish for 8.5 years! Why did I procrastinate for so long ?!? I could have been totally fluent by now!!

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

<<I've been teaching ESL to adult professionals for 10 years. 90% of my clients speak Spanish.>>

I'm curious as to under what conditions this is happening. Are you in a Spanish-speaking country training businessmen to come to the US? Because I would think that Spanish/Mexican companies doing business in the US would already have English speakers at their disposal.

Here in the US, foreign-born professionals with limited English capabilities tend to be Indian, Pakistani, or from other Asian countries.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

I'm in the USA, teaching executives, politicians, business owners, doctors etc. Many clients work for multinationals like GE, P&G, Johnson & Johnson, etc. The personal goals of my clients vary a lot. For the multinationals, English is used at the global level. So when the client is promoted from a local level position (say Sales Manager) to a position with more responsibility, increasing proficiency in English goes with it. The small business owners are often interested in trading outside of LATAM and have suppliers in China and want customers in North America. So they want to be able to negotiate in English.

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

毫无疑问你是对的:) An obsessive 4-6 month Mandarin study (10-12 hours every day) could lead to recognizing a meaning or two and being able to pronounce around 3000 individual characters (4000-4500 is enough for complete fluency outside literature or very specific fields). But to be able to read even a simple new text relatively comfortably at acceptable speed, add another 6 months. That's just the writing. And there's no way to get fluent (at least efficiently) without the ability to read. Listening, another obsessive period of 1 year (could partly overlap with learning to read), slowly getting used to Chinese people's weird ways of trying to speak standard mandarin (depends on which part of China you want to interact with). A substantial amount of 成语 (usually 4 character phrases) that they love to use, add another period of 1 year exposure to massive amounts of texts. It's actually very rewarding to get more and more advanced in Chinese, as learning new vocabulary gets easier and easier (combinations of already known characters' meanings). It just takes enormous amount of time to get up to speed. I would say I already devoted well over 2000 hours to the language in my 26 months of studying it, yet I cannot listen to news or watch tv series freely, and having longer conversations is still difficult. The pronunciation varies too much in real life and it takes big effort to get enough exposure in this regard.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

"slowly getting used to Chinese people's weird ways of trying to speak standard mandarin"

Glad someone said it!

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

It's quite frustrating really

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Where are you learning it?

Mariotkd

pl

PolandJune 2017

2000 hours? That is really a lot! Chinese is like a black hole, it literally takes all of your time and energy. In order to truly master Chinese one needs to move to China and stay there forever, because moving back to our native country will again worsen your skills. Of course this is not about you, but my general observation of people studying Chinese. I'm yet to see anybody with C2 level in Chinese who lives outside of China.

usablefiber

us

United StatesJune 2017

This guy said it took him 1 year of hard study followed by 1 year of living in Taiwan....

You can be the judge of his fluency. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3HOuq4DRJ0

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

Is that 2 years after he started studying? Or is it longer and he just claims to already have been fluent after 2 years? His pronunciation is good, and he is very likely fluent now in other aspects of language than just reading news, but I have a strong feeling that video is not after 2 years of him doing Chinese.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Sounds about right. Steve studied full time (40 hours a week+) as his job. After 10 months he passed the diplomatic exam and visited the canton trade fairs in the following years and was fluent.

Cosmo678

de

GermanyJuly 2017

"Chinese is like a black hole" I completely agree!!

Cosmo678

de

GermanyJuly 2017

I completely agree with your post. I am studying Chinese for about two years (one or sometimes two hours a day, I think about 1000 hours in total). There is no way I can have long discussions. Problem for me are the tones and pronunciation. Sometimes my tutor doesnt understand my words and I have problems understanding what he is saying although I know all the words. In my opinion, it is not possible to achieve real fluency after 6 months. You can say some phrases such as What time is it or where is the train station? but no way you are going to have a conversation with a Chinese about a political topic.

georgiaichigo

br

BrazilJuly 2017

Unfortunely usablefiber. But I can guarantee you'll have a great time when visit Brazil. Besides of that, I can give you some tips of wonderful places to visit, for example: Porto das Galinhas, Fernando de Noronha, Gramado (which is, by the way, my hometow), among others.

Just contact me and I will help you as much as I can.

usablefiber

us

United StatesJune 2017

Yea, My point was that a romance or related European language can be learned well in 6-8 months, but Chinese, Korean, or Arabic, which the OP asked about, you just can't reach native fluency in 6 months which I can say from experience. There is just too much to get used to: grammar, writing, pronunciation, the vocabulary... is all wildly different. It takes time. It's fun, but it takes time.

As for Portuguese? I just thought Brazilian Portuguese sounded really cool and it would be fun and exotic to learn.

Unfortunately, this decision has backfired on me. I moved into a apartment this week in a completely Spanish speaking neighborhood as In the past year and a half I basically studied every language BUT Spanish.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

@usablefiber: "Unfortunately, this decision has backfired on me. I moved into a apartment this week in a completely Spanish speaking neighborhood as In the past year and a half I basically studied every language BUT Spanish."

Similar backfire: I've been teaching ESL to adult professionals for 10 years. 90% of my clients speak Spanish. I studied Latin, German, and Japanese in school. I've thought since I was a kid that Spanish is a beautiful sounding language. In addition, I find Latin American culture absolutely fascinating.

YET: Despite the professional advantage for me, I put off learning Spanish for 8.5 years! Why did I procrastinate for so long ?!? I could have been totally fluent by now!!

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

<<I've been teaching ESL to adult professionals for 10 years. 90% of my clients speak Spanish.>>

I'm curious as to under what conditions this is happening. Are you in a Spanish-speaking country training businessmen to come to the US? Because I would think that Spanish/Mexican companies doing business in the US would already have English speakers at their disposal.

Here in the US, foreign-born professionals with limited English capabilities tend to be Indian, Pakistani, or from other Asian countries.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

I'm in the USA, teaching executives, politicians, business owners, doctors etc. Many clients work for multinationals like GE, P&G, Johnson & Johnson, etc. The personal goals of my clients vary a lot. For the multinationals, English is used at the global level. So when the client is promoted from a local level position (say Sales Manager) to a position with more responsibility, increasing proficiency in English goes with it. The small business owners are often interested in trading outside of LATAM and have suppliers in China and want customers in North America. So they want to be able to negotiate in English.

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

毫无疑问你是对的:) An obsessive 4-6 month Mandarin study (10-12 hours every day) could lead to recognizing a meaning or two and being able to pronounce around 3000 individual characters (4000-4500 is enough for complete fluency outside literature or very specific fields). But to be able to read even a simple new text relatively comfortably at acceptable speed, add another 6 months. That's just the writing. And there's no way to get fluent (at least efficiently) without the ability to read. Listening, another obsessive period of 1 year (could partly overlap with learning to read), slowly getting used to Chinese people's weird ways of trying to speak standard mandarin (depends on which part of China you want to interact with). A substantial amount of 成语 (usually 4 character phrases) that they love to use, add another period of 1 year exposure to massive amounts of texts. It's actually very rewarding to get more and more advanced in Chinese, as learning new vocabulary gets easier and easier (combinations of already known characters' meanings). It just takes enormous amount of time to get up to speed. I would say I already devoted well over 2000 hours to the language in my 26 months of studying it, yet I cannot listen to news or watch tv series freely, and having longer conversations is still difficult. The pronunciation varies too much in real life and it takes big effort to get enough exposure in this regard.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

"slowly getting used to Chinese people's weird ways of trying to speak standard mandarin"

Glad someone said it!

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

It's quite frustrating really

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Where are you learning it?

Mariotkd

pl

PolandJune 2017

2000 hours? That is really a lot! Chinese is like a black hole, it literally takes all of your time and energy. In order to truly master Chinese one needs to move to China and stay there forever, because moving back to our native country will again worsen your skills. Of course this is not about you, but my general observation of people studying Chinese. I'm yet to see anybody with C2 level in Chinese who lives outside of China.

usablefiber

us

United StatesJune 2017

This guy said it took him 1 year of hard study followed by 1 year of living in Taiwan....

You can be the judge of his fluency. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3HOuq4DRJ0

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

Is that 2 years after he started studying? Or is it longer and he just claims to already have been fluent after 2 years? His pronunciation is good, and he is very likely fluent now in other aspects of language than just reading news, but I have a strong feeling that video is not after 2 years of him doing Chinese.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Sounds about right. Steve studied full time (40 hours a week+) as his job. After 10 months he passed the diplomatic exam and visited the canton trade fairs in the following years and was fluent.

Cosmo678

de

GermanyJuly 2017

"Chinese is like a black hole" I completely agree!!

Cosmo678

de

GermanyJuly 2017

I completely agree with your post. I am studying Chinese for about two years (one or sometimes two hours a day, I think about 1000 hours in total). There is no way I can have long discussions. Problem for me are the tones and pronunciation. Sometimes my tutor doesnt understand my words and I have problems understanding what he is saying although I know all the words. In my opinion, it is not possible to achieve real fluency after 6 months. You can say some phrases such as What time is it or where is the train station? but no way you are going to have a conversation with a Chinese about a political topic.

georgiaichigo

br

BrazilJuly 2017

Unfortunely usablefiber. But I can guarantee you'll have a great time when visit Brazil. Besides of that, I can give you some tips of wonderful places to visit, for example: Porto das Galinhas, Fernando de Noronha, Gramado (which is, by the way, my hometow), among others.

Just contact me and I will help you as much as I can.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

@usablefiber: "Unfortunately, this decision has backfired on me. I moved into a apartment this week in a completely Spanish speaking neighborhood as In the past year and a half I basically studied every language BUT Spanish."

Similar backfire: I've been teaching ESL to adult professionals for 10 years. 90% of my clients speak Spanish. I studied Latin, German, and Japanese in school. I've thought since I was a kid that Spanish is a beautiful sounding language. In addition, I find Latin American culture absolutely fascinating.

YET: Despite the professional advantage for me, I put off learning Spanish for 8.5 years! Why did I procrastinate for so long ?!? I could have been totally fluent by now!!

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

<<I've been teaching ESL to adult professionals for 10 years. 90% of my clients speak Spanish.>>

I'm curious as to under what conditions this is happening. Are you in a Spanish-speaking country training businessmen to come to the US? Because I would think that Spanish/Mexican companies doing business in the US would already have English speakers at their disposal.

Here in the US, foreign-born professionals with limited English capabilities tend to be Indian, Pakistani, or from other Asian countries.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

I'm in the USA, teaching executives, politicians, business owners, doctors etc. Many clients work for multinationals like GE, P&G, Johnson & Johnson, etc. The personal goals of my clients vary a lot. For the multinationals, English is used at the global level. So when the client is promoted from a local level position (say Sales Manager) to a position with more responsibility, increasing proficiency in English goes with it. The small business owners are often interested in trading outside of LATAM and have suppliers in China and want customers in North America. So they want to be able to negotiate in English.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

<<I've been teaching ESL to adult professionals for 10 years. 90% of my clients speak Spanish.>>

I'm curious as to under what conditions this is happening. Are you in a Spanish-speaking country training businessmen to come to the US? Because I would think that Spanish/Mexican companies doing business in the US would already have English speakers at their disposal.

Here in the US, foreign-born professionals with limited English capabilities tend to be Indian, Pakistani, or from other Asian countries.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

I'm in the USA, teaching executives, politicians, business owners, doctors etc. Many clients work for multinationals like GE, P&G, Johnson & Johnson, etc. The personal goals of my clients vary a lot. For the multinationals, English is used at the global level. So when the client is promoted from a local level position (say Sales Manager) to a position with more responsibility, increasing proficiency in English goes with it. The small business owners are often interested in trading outside of LATAM and have suppliers in China and want customers in North America. So they want to be able to negotiate in English.

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

毫无疑问你是对的:) An obsessive 4-6 month Mandarin study (10-12 hours every day) could lead to recognizing a meaning or two and being able to pronounce around 3000 individual characters (4000-4500 is enough for complete fluency outside literature or very specific fields). But to be able to read even a simple new text relatively comfortably at acceptable speed, add another 6 months. That's just the writing. And there's no way to get fluent (at least efficiently) without the ability to read. Listening, another obsessive period of 1 year (could partly overlap with learning to read), slowly getting used to Chinese people's weird ways of trying to speak standard mandarin (depends on which part of China you want to interact with). A substantial amount of 成语 (usually 4 character phrases) that they love to use, add another period of 1 year exposure to massive amounts of texts. It's actually very rewarding to get more and more advanced in Chinese, as learning new vocabulary gets easier and easier (combinations of already known characters' meanings). It just takes enormous amount of time to get up to speed. I would say I already devoted well over 2000 hours to the language in my 26 months of studying it, yet I cannot listen to news or watch tv series freely, and having longer conversations is still difficult. The pronunciation varies too much in real life and it takes big effort to get enough exposure in this regard.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

"slowly getting used to Chinese people's weird ways of trying to speak standard mandarin"

Glad someone said it!

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

It's quite frustrating really

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Where are you learning it?

Mariotkd

pl

PolandJune 2017

2000 hours? That is really a lot! Chinese is like a black hole, it literally takes all of your time and energy. In order to truly master Chinese one needs to move to China and stay there forever, because moving back to our native country will again worsen your skills. Of course this is not about you, but my general observation of people studying Chinese. I'm yet to see anybody with C2 level in Chinese who lives outside of China.

usablefiber

us

United StatesJune 2017

This guy said it took him 1 year of hard study followed by 1 year of living in Taiwan....

You can be the judge of his fluency. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3HOuq4DRJ0

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

Is that 2 years after he started studying? Or is it longer and he just claims to already have been fluent after 2 years? His pronunciation is good, and he is very likely fluent now in other aspects of language than just reading news, but I have a strong feeling that video is not after 2 years of him doing Chinese.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Sounds about right. Steve studied full time (40 hours a week+) as his job. After 10 months he passed the diplomatic exam and visited the canton trade fairs in the following years and was fluent.

Cosmo678

de

GermanyJuly 2017

"Chinese is like a black hole" I completely agree!!

Cosmo678

de

GermanyJuly 2017

I completely agree with your post. I am studying Chinese for about two years (one or sometimes two hours a day, I think about 1000 hours in total). There is no way I can have long discussions. Problem for me are the tones and pronunciation. Sometimes my tutor doesnt understand my words and I have problems understanding what he is saying although I know all the words. In my opinion, it is not possible to achieve real fluency after 6 months. You can say some phrases such as What time is it or where is the train station? but no way you are going to have a conversation with a Chinese about a political topic.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

"slowly getting used to Chinese people's weird ways of trying to speak standard mandarin"

Glad someone said it!

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

It's quite frustrating really

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Where are you learning it?

Mariotkd

pl

PolandJune 2017

2000 hours? That is really a lot! Chinese is like a black hole, it literally takes all of your time and energy. In order to truly master Chinese one needs to move to China and stay there forever, because moving back to our native country will again worsen your skills. Of course this is not about you, but my general observation of people studying Chinese. I'm yet to see anybody with C2 level in Chinese who lives outside of China.

usablefiber

us

United StatesJune 2017

This guy said it took him 1 year of hard study followed by 1 year of living in Taiwan....

You can be the judge of his fluency. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3HOuq4DRJ0

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

Is that 2 years after he started studying? Or is it longer and he just claims to already have been fluent after 2 years? His pronunciation is good, and he is very likely fluent now in other aspects of language than just reading news, but I have a strong feeling that video is not after 2 years of him doing Chinese.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Sounds about right. Steve studied full time (40 hours a week+) as his job. After 10 months he passed the diplomatic exam and visited the canton trade fairs in the following years and was fluent.

Cosmo678

de

GermanyJuly 2017

"Chinese is like a black hole" I completely agree!!

usablefiber

us

United StatesJune 2017

This guy said it took him 1 year of hard study followed by 1 year of living in Taiwan....

You can be the judge of his fluency. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3HOuq4DRJ0

Branicek

sk

SlovakiaJune 2017

Is that 2 years after he started studying? Or is it longer and he just claims to already have been fluent after 2 years? His pronunciation is good, and he is very likely fluent now in other aspects of language than just reading news, but I have a strong feeling that video is not after 2 years of him doing Chinese.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Sounds about right. Steve studied full time (40 hours a week+) as his job. After 10 months he passed the diplomatic exam and visited the canton trade fairs in the following years and was fluent.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

I would say as an english speaker doing a European Language, B1 is possible. "High B2"/Fluency is probably a 1-2 year process, with French being on the longer end of that. you'll speed it up a bit if you do 2hrs a day instead of 1.5 hours. If you were going from Spanish-Portuguese, French to Italian, or other Romance Language to another Romance language, I think you could do that "potential" b2/fluency in six months.

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

Interesting, I would like to learn French at some point and did always think If I could get my Spanish get to a high enough level I would be able to learn another romance language some what quicker. what would you describe a person who is a B1 level able to do?

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

The level of "fluency" you wrote about above is probably between B1 and B2. I, along with Steve and many others, would consider B2, or confident B2, "fluency."

When I reach 1,200 hours of study, 35K words of Spanish, 2 million words read, 45K lingqs, 500 hrs of listening, and possibly 100 hours spoken (including a trip to Latin America as a reward), I'll move on to either French, Russian, Arabic, or Chinese.

I might do the French first to "Get it out of the way." (I think, having Spanish, 1.5-2 hours a day for 9 months would do it for "potential fluency.") Then I'd move onto one of the hard languages. However, I might go with one of the harder ones first so it's not TOO close to Spanish and make it more likely that'll mix them up.

Overall, my goal is to have an "easy" language (Spanish), a hard one (likely Russian), and a very hard one (Chinese or Arabic). French I always loved and that's what I started in school and I have a "score" to settle with a dreadful teacher from back in the day.

To answer your question about what a b1 person could do.

I can understand the main points

of clear standard speech on

familiar matters regularly

encountered in work, school,

leisure, etc. I can understand the

main point of many radio or TV

programmes on current affairs or

topics of personal or professional

interest when the delivery is

relatively slow and clear.

I can understand texts that consist

mainly of high frequency everyday

or job-related language. I can

understand the description of

events, feelings and wishes in

personal letters.

I can deal with most situations

likely to arise whilst travelling in an

area where the language is

spoken. I can enter unprepared

into conversation on topics that

are familiar, of personal interest or

pertinent to everyday life (e.g.

family, hobbies, work, travel and

current events).

I can connect phrases in a simple

way in order to describe

experiences and events, my

dreams, hopes and ambitions. I

can briefly give reasons and

explanations for opinions and

plans. I can narrate a story or

relate the plot of a book or film and

describe my reactions.

I can write simple connected text

on topics which are familiar or of

personal interest. I can write

personal letters describing

experiences and impressions.

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

fantastic reply my god if I could do all that is mentioned above in Spanish and any other European languages I would be very very happy with myself!!

Thank you for answering my question I do seem to see you pop up a lot when it comes to Spanish thanks for all the advise and I am sure you see my name a lot too pooing up everywhere haha!

Muchas Gracias amigo!

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

No prob. De nada, mate.

And if that's the level you are happy with and comfortable with--or at least to acquire the known words to "potentially" reach that level if you were to "activate" the language (living in the country, etc.)--you'll be able to move on to other languages faster. For me, I could have moved on to others sooner, and it's the Spanish learning that seems to have taken the longest (i've dragged out my 7-900 hours over years). However, because I am in the US and this was the first language, I want that to be the "best."

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

and do you think that using an audio book instead of watching films and movies to be more productive

Miznia

us

United StatesJune 2017

I think it depends on whether you're (merely) watching the films/movies or actually studying them. I think it could be awfully tempting to just let the film play and not get much out of it.

This is a description of B1:

Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.

Can deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in an area where the language is spoken.

Can produce simple connected text on topics that are familiar or of personal interest.

Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

And B2:

Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in their field of specialization.

Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party.

Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Yes. I replied in more detail in the "after how many words" thread.

However, I missed this earlier today when I first read this thread. You wrote, "...after 3 months start watching series with Spanish subtitles to improve listening and of course reading along while still doing my 2 hours a day of spanish to keep building on my vocab"

From here it sounds like the TV shows are just a "bonus" to learning, rather than replacing it. As long as you're doing your 2 hrs/day of "real" learning, give the shows a whirl. But, I think you'll find, as I said in the other thread, there might be too many unknown words in the subtitles to make it enjoyable. .....you do get to look at the pretty senoritas though.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

Don't miss the TV telenovela series "Destinos" http://learner.org/series/destinos/

It is an interesting plot-driven mystery. It's made for people learning Spanish as a Second Language, it's appropriately designed for absolute beginners. and you'll get about 25 hours of listening practice.

hellion

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

Annoyingly they removed access to the course for certain countries (including mine). Not sure if anyone knows where to find it elsewhere?

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

Interesting, I would like to learn French at some point and did always think If I could get my Spanish get to a high enough level I would be able to learn another romance language some what quicker. what would you describe a person who is a B1 level able to do?

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

The level of "fluency" you wrote about above is probably between B1 and B2. I, along with Steve and many others, would consider B2, or confident B2, "fluency."

When I reach 1,200 hours of study, 35K words of Spanish, 2 million words read, 45K lingqs, 500 hrs of listening, and possibly 100 hours spoken (including a trip to Latin America as a reward), I'll move on to either French, Russian, Arabic, or Chinese.

I might do the French first to "Get it out of the way." (I think, having Spanish, 1.5-2 hours a day for 9 months would do it for "potential fluency.") Then I'd move onto one of the hard languages. However, I might go with one of the harder ones first so it's not TOO close to Spanish and make it more likely that'll mix them up.

Overall, my goal is to have an "easy" language (Spanish), a hard one (likely Russian), and a very hard one (Chinese or Arabic). French I always loved and that's what I started in school and I have a "score" to settle with a dreadful teacher from back in the day.

To answer your question about what a b1 person could do.

I can understand the main points

of clear standard speech on

familiar matters regularly

encountered in work, school,

leisure, etc. I can understand the

main point of many radio or TV

programmes on current affairs or

topics of personal or professional

interest when the delivery is

relatively slow and clear.

I can understand texts that consist

mainly of high frequency everyday

or job-related language. I can

understand the description of

events, feelings and wishes in

personal letters.

I can deal with most situations

likely to arise whilst travelling in an

area where the language is

spoken. I can enter unprepared

into conversation on topics that

are familiar, of personal interest or

pertinent to everyday life (e.g.

family, hobbies, work, travel and

current events).

I can connect phrases in a simple

way in order to describe

experiences and events, my

dreams, hopes and ambitions. I

can briefly give reasons and

explanations for opinions and

plans. I can narrate a story or

relate the plot of a book or film and

describe my reactions.

I can write simple connected text

on topics which are familiar or of

personal interest. I can write

personal letters describing

experiences and impressions.

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

fantastic reply my god if I could do all that is mentioned above in Spanish and any other European languages I would be very very happy with myself!!

Thank you for answering my question I do seem to see you pop up a lot when it comes to Spanish thanks for all the advise and I am sure you see my name a lot too pooing up everywhere haha!

Muchas Gracias amigo!

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

No prob. De nada, mate.

And if that's the level you are happy with and comfortable with--or at least to acquire the known words to "potentially" reach that level if you were to "activate" the language (living in the country, etc.)--you'll be able to move on to other languages faster. For me, I could have moved on to others sooner, and it's the Spanish learning that seems to have taken the longest (i've dragged out my 7-900 hours over years). However, because I am in the US and this was the first language, I want that to be the "best."

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

The level of "fluency" you wrote about above is probably between B1 and B2. I, along with Steve and many others, would consider B2, or confident B2, "fluency."

When I reach 1,200 hours of study, 35K words of Spanish, 2 million words read, 45K lingqs, 500 hrs of listening, and possibly 100 hours spoken (including a trip to Latin America as a reward), I'll move on to either French, Russian, Arabic, or Chinese.

I might do the French first to "Get it out of the way." (I think, having Spanish, 1.5-2 hours a day for 9 months would do it for "potential fluency.") Then I'd move onto one of the hard languages. However, I might go with one of the harder ones first so it's not TOO close to Spanish and make it more likely that'll mix them up.

Overall, my goal is to have an "easy" language (Spanish), a hard one (likely Russian), and a very hard one (Chinese or Arabic). French I always loved and that's what I started in school and I have a "score" to settle with a dreadful teacher from back in the day.

To answer your question about what a b1 person could do.

I can understand the main points

of clear standard speech on

familiar matters regularly

encountered in work, school,

leisure, etc. I can understand the

main point of many radio or TV

programmes on current affairs or

topics of personal or professional

interest when the delivery is

relatively slow and clear.

I can understand texts that consist

mainly of high frequency everyday

or job-related language. I can

understand the description of

events, feelings and wishes in

personal letters.

I can deal with most situations

likely to arise whilst travelling in an

area where the language is

spoken. I can enter unprepared

into conversation on topics that

are familiar, of personal interest or

pertinent to everyday life (e.g.

family, hobbies, work, travel and

current events).

I can connect phrases in a simple

way in order to describe

experiences and events, my

dreams, hopes and ambitions. I

can briefly give reasons and

explanations for opinions and

plans. I can narrate a story or

relate the plot of a book or film and

describe my reactions.

I can write simple connected text

on topics which are familiar or of

personal interest. I can write

personal letters describing

experiences and impressions.

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

fantastic reply my god if I could do all that is mentioned above in Spanish and any other European languages I would be very very happy with myself!!

Thank you for answering my question I do seem to see you pop up a lot when it comes to Spanish thanks for all the advise and I am sure you see my name a lot too pooing up everywhere haha!

Muchas Gracias amigo!

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

No prob. De nada, mate.

And if that's the level you are happy with and comfortable with--or at least to acquire the known words to "potentially" reach that level if you were to "activate" the language (living in the country, etc.)--you'll be able to move on to other languages faster. For me, I could have moved on to others sooner, and it's the Spanish learning that seems to have taken the longest (i've dragged out my 7-900 hours over years). However, because I am in the US and this was the first language, I want that to be the "best."

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

fantastic reply my god if I could do all that is mentioned above in Spanish and any other European languages I would be very very happy with myself!!

Thank you for answering my question I do seem to see you pop up a lot when it comes to Spanish thanks for all the advise and I am sure you see my name a lot too pooing up everywhere haha!

Muchas Gracias amigo!

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

No prob. De nada, mate.

And if that's the level you are happy with and comfortable with--or at least to acquire the known words to "potentially" reach that level if you were to "activate" the language (living in the country, etc.)--you'll be able to move on to other languages faster. For me, I could have moved on to others sooner, and it's the Spanish learning that seems to have taken the longest (i've dragged out my 7-900 hours over years). However, because I am in the US and this was the first language, I want that to be the "best."

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

and do you think that using an audio book instead of watching films and movies to be more productive

Miznia

us

United StatesJune 2017

I think it depends on whether you're (merely) watching the films/movies or actually studying them. I think it could be awfully tempting to just let the film play and not get much out of it.

This is a description of B1:

Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.

Can deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in an area where the language is spoken.

Can produce simple connected text on topics that are familiar or of personal interest.

Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

And B2:

Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in their field of specialization.

Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party.

Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Yes. I replied in more detail in the "after how many words" thread.

However, I missed this earlier today when I first read this thread. You wrote, "...after 3 months start watching series with Spanish subtitles to improve listening and of course reading along while still doing my 2 hours a day of spanish to keep building on my vocab"

From here it sounds like the TV shows are just a "bonus" to learning, rather than replacing it. As long as you're doing your 2 hrs/day of "real" learning, give the shows a whirl. But, I think you'll find, as I said in the other thread, there might be too many unknown words in the subtitles to make it enjoyable. .....you do get to look at the pretty senoritas though.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

Don't miss the TV telenovela series "Destinos" http://learner.org/series/destinos/

It is an interesting plot-driven mystery. It's made for people learning Spanish as a Second Language, it's appropriately designed for absolute beginners. and you'll get about 25 hours of listening practice.

hellion

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

Annoyingly they removed access to the course for certain countries (including mine). Not sure if anyone knows where to find it elsewhere?

Miznia

us

United StatesJune 2017

I think it depends on whether you're (merely) watching the films/movies or actually studying them. I think it could be awfully tempting to just let the film play and not get much out of it.

This is a description of B1:

Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.

Can deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in an area where the language is spoken.

Can produce simple connected text on topics that are familiar or of personal interest.

Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

And B2:

Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in their field of specialization.

Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party.

Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.

t_harangi

us

United StatesJune 2017

I'm big fan of Assimil and have used it to start all my languages. Realistically 6 months to B1 is what you should expect. If you push it, you could maybe do B2. I have a formula for people when they ask me about languages: Assimil + @45 mins / day x 6 days a week = B1 in 6 months -- possibly B2 in 6 to 9 months possibly, maybe C1 in 12. This is a sustainable pace for most people who are motivated.

But I think the most important language tip I could give to people is this: Study regularly without worrying about the outcome. Concentrating on "when will I reach 'X'" is counter productive. You'll get better and more comfortable over time. But the levels of B2, C1 etc are somewhat elusive to define and in reality no bells and whistles are gonna go off anywhere announcing you've reached this or that level. Yes, your avatar on Lingq is gonna grow and your word count numbers will go up and all that is a lot of fun and very satisfying, but those are still just indicators where you might be in a language. I know people who "test at C2" but have a hard time actually communicating.

[Etudiant1]

aw

ArubaJune 2017

That is true and wonderfully written!

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

I do understand what you are saying but it is also nice to have some kind of goal and targers in mind,again I only at this moment in time speak English and I kind of already have a plan of what my target 6 month is going to be like, first 3 months use Lingq for 2 hours everyday building vocab and listening, after 3 months start watching series with Spanish subtitles to improve listening and of course reading along while still doing my 2 hours a day of spanish to keep building on my vocab and also after the 3 month start to speak as I like to think I would have assumed enough vocab to somewhat express myself limited anyway. I suppose ultimately the only way to find out what level or how greatly you can learn the language is just by doing it!

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Nice post. Out of curiosity, where are they doing this testing? Is it the DELE (Spanish?) Other places?

hellion

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

Haha, I can identify with this, I frequently test between B2-C1 on placement tests for immersion courses but the truth is I can barely string a sentence together and I literally get nothing when I listen to the radio.

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

I do understand what you are saying but it is also nice to have some kind of goal and targers in mind,again I only at this moment in time speak English and I kind of already have a plan of what my target 6 month is going to be like, first 3 months use Lingq for 2 hours everyday building vocab and listening, after 3 months start watching series with Spanish subtitles to improve listening and of course reading along while still doing my 2 hours a day of spanish to keep building on my vocab and also after the 3 month start to speak as I like to think I would have assumed enough vocab to somewhat express myself limited anyway. I suppose ultimately the only way to find out what level or how greatly you can learn the language is just by doing it!

SilverWisdom

pt

PortugalJune 2017

I have been learning German for 6 months and only now have started reading within the past few weeks. I wasted a lot of time on beginner material and flashcards. I only speak English and this was my first attempt at learning a second language.

When you learn another language for the first time, you're also learning how 'to learn languages' which is difficult because there is so many opinions and less than efficient methods being given by people who wish to sell you their product. Which beginner material to use? Input or output? how much time? flashcards? lists? just watching television? grammar? etc etc It takes time to find out the truth of how one should study a language and unfortunately often trial and error but since you're here, I'd assume that to be a good start although you might be missing many things taught to beginners...

My opinion on time is that 6 months for someone unaccustomed to learning languages will most likely not achieve B2. It is more difficult than it appears at first and in the first month, I'd say most learners would be lucky to have memorized the alphabet, sounds, very basic grammar and 500-1000 words of vocabulary.

6 months to B2 fluency is probably not going to happen with only 2 hours per day. It sounds easier on paper but practically is more difficult and stressful. I am very stressed and I don't even know what to do for writing or speaking yet. I have ideas but I imagine that will be an entirely new world of issues and stress.

Diotallevi

de

GermanyJune 2017

Lots of fun and good luck with your German

Feel free to use exchange and the German help forum, we will gladly help you.

TroisRoyaumes

ca

CanadaJune 2017

@SilverWisdom: Very well said.

[DrewPeacock]

aw

ArubaJune 2017

You need to define 'fluency', define what you would be doing for the 2 hours per day and what the language is, in relation to your native language.

B2 isn't possible without massive input AND output for 6 months. We're talking 4+ hours per day of efficient, focussed study.

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

For me personally I think I would like to be able to be comfortable in the language and being able to express myself some what freely and not have to really focus when speaking.

Miznia

us

United StatesJune 2017

Doing some googling it looks like B1 should be at least possible given 364 hours. I don't see how you would have the time to develop the speaking/writing ability called for by B2.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

From an ESL teacher who gets asked this question all the time, try to think of your practice in hours, not months. There's been many high-quality linguistics studies done to try to answer this. Partly, the number of hours depends on what your native language is, and what your target language is.

Steve wrote a great blog answering this here: https://blog.thelinguist.com/how-long-should-it-take-to-learn-a-language.

There's a very good article from the bbc here: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-23407265

And a helpful chart here: http://www.languagetesting.com/how-long-does-it-take

So, since I'm learning Spanish, like you, I'm guessing I need 900 hours of practicing Spanish to get to to the nice level of fluency I want.

At the time I have available to practice, I imagine it will take me about 3 years to get in my 900 hours. I'm hoping I'll have 18000 words learned on LingQ by then.

I spent about 250 hours or so in the last 12 months using LingQ. I used to get 5-10 minutes a day playing with duolingo, but I quit that a month after I completed the program's tree-- that was all I used for grammar practice. I also did level 1 on Pimsleur (which I borrowed from the library).

I also get additional practice:

- watching movies/TV on Netflix (my favorite series now is "Los Héroes del Norte" )

- watching "destinos" http://learner.org/series/destinos/

- listening to Radio Ambulante podcast

The LingQ system is awesome. It really works. I try to convince all my students to use it.

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

I have to agree with the Lingq part I do feel like I am slowly learning the patterns of the language and my vocabulary is slowly improving you say you want or will need 900 hours I assume that you want your Spanish to be at a C2 level from those numbers of hours? and I have had a look at the scale on google as to what level is achievable by hours.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Can you post a link to this Google scale of hours?

C2 would seem quite difficult to achieve unless you are in the country, especially with only 900 hours. C2 is really, really good. Think Steve's French or a little above that.

B2, at least "high" B2 is what I would call fluency. jimgoldschmidt is probably in the high B1/low B2 with 18,000 words. However, if he puts in 900 hours, I think he'll have a higher word count than that and probably a higher "potential" (Steve's words) for fluency, likely in the high B2 range. But that's just guessing.

Personally, and just for reference, I'm going for confident/high B2 or low C1 with 35,000 words and 1,200 hours invested. I'm at 31,000 and 7-900 hours at present and would consider myself a solid B2, except for listening to certain content unassisted and reading novels (haven't done as much of either). Right now I'm doing the listening with the telenovelas (get essentially 100% reading subtitles too) and will hit the novels in LingQ when I get a new iPad.

jimgoldschmidt

us

United StatesJune 2017

From an ESL teacher who gets asked this question all the time, try to think of your practice in hours, not months. There's been many high-quality linguistics studies done to try to answer this. Partly, the number of hours depends on what your native language is, and what your target language is.

Steve wrote a great blog answering this here: https://blog.thelinguist.com/how-long-should-it-take-to-learn-a-language.

There's a very good article from the bbc here: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-23407265

And a helpful chart here: http://www.languagetesting.com/how-long-does-it-take

So, since I'm learning Spanish, like you, I'm guessing I need 900 hours of practicing Spanish to get to to the nice level of fluency I want.

At the time I have available to practice, I imagine it will take me about 3 years to get in my 900 hours. I'm hoping I'll have 18000 words learned on LingQ by then.

I spent about 250 hours or so in the last 12 months using LingQ. I used to get 5-10 minutes a day playing with duolingo, but I quit that a month after I completed the program's tree-- that was all I used for grammar practice. I also did level 1 on Pimsleur (which I borrowed from the library).

I also get additional practice:

- watching movies/TV on Netflix (my favorite series now is "Los Héroes del Norte" )

- watching "destinos" http://learner.org/series/destinos/

- listening to Radio Ambulante podcast

The LingQ system is awesome. It really works. I try to convince all my students to use it.

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

I have to agree with the Lingq part I do feel like I am slowly learning the patterns of the language and my vocabulary is slowly improving you say you want or will need 900 hours I assume that you want your Spanish to be at a C2 level from those numbers of hours? and I have had a look at the scale on google as to what level is achievable by hours.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Can you post a link to this Google scale of hours?

C2 would seem quite difficult to achieve unless you are in the country, especially with only 900 hours. C2 is really, really good. Think Steve's French or a little above that.

B2, at least "high" B2 is what I would call fluency. jimgoldschmidt is probably in the high B1/low B2 with 18,000 words. However, if he puts in 900 hours, I think he'll have a higher word count than that and probably a higher "potential" (Steve's words) for fluency, likely in the high B2 range. But that's just guessing.

Personally, and just for reference, I'm going for confident/high B2 or low C1 with 35,000 words and 1,200 hours invested. I'm at 31,000 and 7-900 hours at present and would consider myself a solid B2, except for listening to certain content unassisted and reading novels (haven't done as much of either). Right now I'm doing the listening with the telenovelas (get essentially 100% reading subtitles too) and will hit the novels in LingQ when I get a new iPad.

jonesjack

gb

United KingdomJune 2017

I have to agree with the Lingq part I do feel like I am slowly learning the patterns of the language and my vocabulary is slowly improving you say you want or will need 900 hours I assume that you want your Spanish to be at a C2 level from those numbers of hours? and I have had a look at the scale on google as to what level is achievable by hours.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Can you post a link to this Google scale of hours?

C2 would seem quite difficult to achieve unless you are in the country, especially with only 900 hours. C2 is really, really good. Think Steve's French or a little above that.

B2, at least "high" B2 is what I would call fluency. jimgoldschmidt is probably in the high B1/low B2 with 18,000 words. However, if he puts in 900 hours, I think he'll have a higher word count than that and probably a higher "potential" (Steve's words) for fluency, likely in the high B2 range. But that's just guessing.

Personally, and just for reference, I'm going for confident/high B2 or low C1 with 35,000 words and 1,200 hours invested. I'm at 31,000 and 7-900 hours at present and would consider myself a solid B2, except for listening to certain content unassisted and reading novels (haven't done as much of either). Right now I'm doing the listening with the telenovelas (get essentially 100% reading subtitles too) and will hit the novels in LingQ when I get a new iPad.

LILingquist

us

United StatesJune 2017

Can you post a link to this Google scale of hours?

C2 would seem quite difficult to achieve unless you are in the country, especially with only 900 hours. C2 is really, really good. Think Steve's French or a little above that.

B2, at least "high" B2 is what I would call fluency. jimgoldschmidt is probably in the high B1/low B2 with 18,000 words. However, if he puts in 900 hours, I think he'll have a higher word count than that and probably a higher "potential" (Steve's words) for fluency, likely in the high B2 range. But that's just guessing.

Personally, and just for reference, I'm going for confident/high B2 or low C1 with 35,000 words and 1,200 hours invested. I'm at 31,000 and 7-900 hours at present and would consider myself a solid B2, except for listening to certain content unassisted and reading novels (haven't done as much of either). Right now I'm doing the listening with the telenovelas (get essentially 100% reading subtitles too) and will hit the novels in LingQ when I get a new iPad.

Video liên quan